Advent Day 02: Not All Who Wander Are Lost …

Christmas is amazing — and radical. It challenges wanderers to let their imaginations run wild. Christmas is an irrational, impossible, paradoxical season the infinite in the finite, God’s light in the gloom of our world, the whole of the universe concentrated in a little baby, the God of The Big Bang and the galaxies appearing in a homeless, working class, and soon-to-be refugee family.

… may you be sensitive to the awe and wonder of the Incarnation. As you experience the many births of Christ in your life and in our world, I pray that you will embody, in the gloom of our time, the wisdom of J.R.R. Tolkien , who wrote that “not all who wander are lost”.

— Bruce Epperly from I Wonder as I Wander: The 12 Days of Christmas

 

Beginning to Begin

Can we recognize that now and then there comes
an inner sense,
a fleeting thought, a little yearning
to live our lives differently?
We don’t know what this means or what it requires.
We shake these notions off like a dog shakes off water
And go about our business.
But the longing continues.

Who has the time, we ask? What is it anyway?
Reorganize to do what? Stop?
Do nothing? Be quiet?
What for?

Our practical selves only know how to perfect,
produce and perform.
This, at least, we can see as useful. This has results.
We want to believe in this way of perceiving.
For a little while it seems to give us
some sort of self-image.
But the longing doesn’t let us alone. It won’t go away.
We become even busier perhaps
to “take care of it.”
We numb ourselves with distractions— things to do,
consume, and maintain—
things to collect, experience, and entertain.
We can always think of more miles to run.

Still the little yearning continues …
Could we sense that this longing is not lack
or something worse
some kind of fundamental fault in us?
Could we receive it as an invitation instead,
a calling, a small voice inviting us home,
back to our truer self?
This shift in thought can move mountains.
It can let us begin to begin.
— Gunilla Norris from Inviting Silence

 

Walking Blessing

That each step
may be a shedding.
That you will let yourself
become lost.
That when it looks
like you’re going backwards,
you may be making progress.
That progress is not the goal anyway,
but presence
to the feel of the path on your skin,
to the way it reshapes you
in each place it makes contact,
to the way you cannot see it
until the moment you have stepped out.
― Jan Richardson from In Wisdom’s Path: Discovering the Sacred
in Every Season

 

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