Come Home and Rest …

… my early life planted within me two seeds of certainty: that we are each deeply and consistently loved by the Mystery that is larger than ourselves, by the Beloved that is always with us; and that we are each responsible for our choices. This does not mean we always make the right choice. I have made and will no doubt again make choices that have caused suffering for myself or others. In “The Way of the Tao” Lao-Tzu reminds us that the master trusts even those who are untrustworthy. Even knowing our human frailties the Mystery endows us with free will and does not interfere with the choices we make. This is how loved we are. And no matter what our choices are, the voice of the Beloved still calls to us, still asks us to come home and rest.
— Oriah Mountain Dreamer from The Call: Discovering Why You Are Here

There is a twilight zone in our hearts that we ourselves cannot see. Even when we know quite a lot about ourselves-our gifts and weaknesses, our ambitions and aspirations, our motives and our drives-large parts of ourselves remain in the shadow of consciousness. This is a very good thing. We will always remain partially hidden to ourselves. Other people, especially those who love us, can often see our twilight zones better than we ourselves can. The way we are seen and understood by others is different from the way we see and understand ourselves. We will never fully know the significance of our presence in the lives of our friends. That’s a grace, a grace that calls us not only to humility, but to a deep trust in those who love us. It is the twilight zones of our hearts where true friendships are born.
― Henri J.M. Nouwen from Bread For The Journey: A Daybook of Wisdom and Faith

The spiritual life does not remove us from the world but leads us deeper into it.
― Henri J.M. Nouwen from Words of Hope and Healing

Mindfulness is moment-to-moment, non-judgmental awareness, cultivated by paying attention.  Mindfulness arises naturally from living.  It can be strengthened through practice.  This practice is sometimes called meditation.  But meditation is not what you think. Meditation is really about paying attention, and the only way we can pay attention is through the senses, all of them, including the mind.  Mindfulness is a way of befriending ourselves, and our experience.  Of course, our experience is vast, and includes our own body, our mind, and the entire world.
— Jon Kabat Zinn from Arriving at Your Own Door

…Looking into the waters
of that flooding plain
there was a sense
that I made some symmetry
with the waiting world
just by seeing and hearing
and that I walked a frontier
between an inward heaven
and the great blue calling,
bird filled, breathing
we call a sky,
and that I stood at the edge
where two worlds
extended both far away
and close within,
so that I raised my palms
against the light
to see that they were real
and could hold the world
between my careful palms,
one horizon between two cradling skies,
looking inward and outward,
and astonished by the great everywhere
both within and without
like an invisible
unspoken invitation
radiating from where I stood,
I saw everything given
and everything taken from me,
I saw the way I had come
and the way I had promised to go,
all in one movement
as something I had become now
and would be forever,
the sheer generosity of being loved
through loving:
the miracle reflection of a twice blessed life.
David Whyte (Excerpted from CROSSING THE FLOOD, February 2014)

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